Thursday, July 16, 2009

Spaeth working with Fitzgerald

There was an interesting story on SI.com today about a camp Larry Fitzgerald is running in Minnesota for NFL receivers and defensive backs with help from Jerry Rice and Cris Carter.

One of the players in attendance at the camp has been Steelers tight end Matt Spaeth.

If you haven't checked out the story yet, give it a read.

16 comments:

kyle said...

nobody is going to make the "i hope larry can teach him to block" comment? i'm impressed.

Anonymous said...

Yeah, I was positive this post would generate a lot of snide comments.

Patrick said...

Spaeth is Spaeth. I don't know what people want from their #2 TE, when an incredible #1 TE is hardly used to his best abilities, but its not a headline maker.

kyle said...

i guess the blame lies at the feet of the spread offense. there are no blocking tight ends coming out of college anymore. if you don't put up big catch and td numbers you aren't worth a look.

just like with ward, he's considered an anomaly because he can block so well. every wideout should be able to block. it's part of the position. it's just been devalued ad infinitum.

i don't hate spaeth either. i'd like him to get to where he's at least a decent blocker and a red zone threat. that's all.

Anonymous said...

I just wish he handn't been a 3rd round pick. I would say he values at around a 5th rounder. Big difference.

adamg said...

If Miller is re-signed, I don't see the Steelers making a big effort to keep Spaeth so maybe his attending this camp is just to try and open some other eyes around the league.

Arians (and Ben) likes to chuck the ball up there, but Tomlin seems more of a power running attack coach. I think we're seeing Tomlin start to put that stamp on the team, too. A player like Spaeth just isn't ideal for that kind of offense.

other_patrick said...

He's a lousy Blocker but an above average receiver in my opinion. He has good hands but seems to be tackled easily.

The total package TE needs to do both.

Hopefully he's working on his deficiencies at least as much as he's honing his strengths.

I would think you could probably pick up Tuman type blocking guys easily enough. You could potentially develop undersized undrafted tackles into this kind of player.

bmonaghan said...

How 'bout a link?

Keevin said...

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/writers/jim_trotter/07/16/wrs/index.html?eref=T1

TURFgeek said...

Good observation by adamg. Perhaps this was a way for Spaeth to showcase his skills to a more pass-oriented team... like Arizona.

Anonymous said...

Am I the only one that thought he did a very good job when Miller was hurt last season. I actually think he might be a better recieving threat than Miller (exlucing RAC). Just because Arians doesn't utilize his talents doesn't make him a bad player.

Anonymous said...

What ever happened to the old habit of providing a link to the articles you blog?

Anonymous said...

He goes down too easily after catching the ball. Other than that and not being able to block, he's great.

Dale Lolley said...

Heath Miller caught 48 passes last season and missed a couple of games. That's an average of three receptions per game.
Ward caught 80 balls and Holmes was over 50. There are only so many passes to go around.

Patrick said...

Dale, I think those stats re-empahisize why we need all on the same field at once. If the D can zero in one guy then it doesn't go in the Steelers favor.

It's actually quite similar to what the Patriots did early in the decade. No stud receiving stats but plenty of guys who can catch. And thats all that matters.

Mikey said...

I have to laugh at Kyle's comment above: To suggest that the reason Spaeth is not a great blocker is because of the spread offense.

I have news for you, the Minnesota team Spaeth played on was as far from a spread offense as you can get. They played almost exclusively a power running game and had little to no passing threat.

See Marion Barber, Lawrence Maroney and Gary Russell as examples.